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06 May 2008 @ 11:07 am
drive-by update  

I started exercising about ten days ago. Ted has lost three pounds. *squinchy face* He said to me, “Keep up whatever you’re doing!” :) *laughs* *Men*. :)

Uh. Research questions: what’s the Italian for sorrow? Is “prime” the Latin plural of “primus”, and is it too mortally offensive to essentially Anglicize that and turn it into “primes” for a multitude of firsts, because I suspect most readers are probably unlikely to actually go from “Primus” as a singular to “Prime” as a plural? Uhm. I probably have other questions too, but those two are the ones that’ve leapt to mind just now. eta: Also: what would be the French for "the river Seine speech", or "the speech given on the river Seine"?

I have been meaning for *weeks* to mention, with delight, that the P-Con Match It For Pratchett donation box brought in $220. I wanted to say thank you to everybody who dropped a couple euro into the pot. You guys are awesome.

Back on my head.

(x-posted from the essential kit)
 
 
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Annasciamanna on May 6th, 2008 10:43 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
::raises hand::

...I wouldn't go for Dispiacere. It's not really regretful sorrow, anyway -- or at least, it's not the way it's mostly used in modern Italian.

On the other hand, it wouldn't be incorrect, so if you like the sound of it, go for it. It does mean "sorrow" (as well as "displeasure"). (It's masculine, and it can't be made feminine -- but that's not a problem because ships can have masculine names in Italian.)

Otherwise, lessee...

I can come up with three other possibilities:

Dolore: sorrow or pain (physical or mental).

Tristezza: sorrow or sadness

Cordoglio: sorrow or grief (most often used to mean "grief", as in "grieving")

...I'll be happy to go into more detail if you have questions!
kitmizkit on May 7th, 2008 09:17 am (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
I bet "Tristezza" is the most recognizeable of those to anybody who's studied a romance language. But "cordoglio" is *perfect* contextually, if it's used to mean grief or grieving. *beams* Awesome. Thank you so much!
Annasciamanna on May 7th, 2008 10:00 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Glad to help!

...oh, and now that I think of it, it doesn't even sound as bad as it looks. The "gl" is pronounced much like a Spanish "ll", not like English "gl". Much smoother all around. Just in case you were worrying :-)
kitmizkit on May 8th, 2008 08:36 am (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Ooh! I hadn't been worried, but that's good to know. It does make it a much prettier word, doesn't it?
kitmizkit on May 16th, 2008 05:22 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
While I'm on the topic of Italian translations, what would be the translation for "priest" or "father" in terms of a priest? :)
Annasciamanna on May 16th, 2008 05:28 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Padre. That's easy :-)
kitmizkit on May 16th, 2008 05:30 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Thank you thank you thank you! :)