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06 May 2008 @ 11:07 am
drive-by update  

I started exercising about ten days ago. Ted has lost three pounds. *squinchy face* He said to me, “Keep up whatever you’re doing!” :) *laughs* *Men*. :)

Uh. Research questions: what’s the Italian for sorrow? Is “prime” the Latin plural of “primus”, and is it too mortally offensive to essentially Anglicize that and turn it into “primes” for a multitude of firsts, because I suspect most readers are probably unlikely to actually go from “Primus” as a singular to “Prime” as a plural? Uhm. I probably have other questions too, but those two are the ones that’ve leapt to mind just now. eta: Also: what would be the French for "the river Seine speech", or "the speech given on the river Seine"?

I have been meaning for *weeks* to mention, with delight, that the P-Con Match It For Pratchett donation box brought in $220. I wanted to say thank you to everybody who dropped a couple euro into the pot. You guys are awesome.

Back on my head.

(x-posted from the essential kit)
 
 
Current Mood: workingworking
 
 
 
kitmizkit on May 6th, 2008 12:28 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
It's the name of a ship, actually, and regretful sorrow is contextually the idea I want to get across. Dispiacere may well be my word. Thank you! (I know I've got a couple native Italian-speakers on my flist, so hopefully one of them will chime in and make sure this is right. :))
The Renaissance Manunixronin on May 6th, 2008 12:50 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Regretful Sorrow sounds almost Culture-ish.
Laura Anne Gilmansuricattus on May 6th, 2008 01:13 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Just remember to make her feminine!

(also "started exercising"? Because all that walking you were doing was just, y'know, totally slothful...)
kitmizkit on May 6th, 2008 01:17 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Would feminising it change the final vowel to an "a", or is it just a matter of being la Dispiacere? (I don't know any Italian at all. Except, like, "arrivedierce". :))

Oh, well, I've stepped up the walking (er, no pun intended, but excuse me while I laugh at myself *laugh*), see. What I was doing was keeping me from getting any fatter, but I'm trying to to actually reduce again, so 'exercise' apparently means "putting more effort into it than I'd been doing before." Perhaps my mindset is askew.

...like we didn't know /that/ already. :)
Laura Anne Gilmansuricattus on May 6th, 2008 08:23 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
I think it would be l'dispiacere for the infinitive. La dispaccia, first person singular?

Oh gods how I hate conjugating, in any language...
Annasciamanna on May 6th, 2008 10:52 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
LOL! We have succeeded in confusing you with our crazee language! :-)

The trick is that "dispiacere" is both a noun and a verb. But if you're using it as a ship name, you want the noun, not the verb -- so it doesn't need conjugating. (Which is just as well, because Italian conjugations are not for the faint of heart...)
Laura Anne Gilmansuricattus on May 6th, 2008 11:01 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
*chortle* I love Italian, but my usual MO when traveling is to is to use my nouns and wave my hands madly. That seems to do the trick...

(and when in doubt, I slip into Spanish)
Annasciamanna on May 6th, 2008 10:49 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
The bad news is that you just can't feminise "dispiacere". Most nouns in Italian have one fixed gender. (The exception are some of the nouns that refer to people or animals -- and not even all of them. And they don't always make sense, either: for example, "soprano" is a masculine name, despite the fact that for the past couple of centuries pretty much all sopranos have been female...)

Anyway -- the good news is that, as I mentioned in another comment, you can cheerfully use a masculine name for a ship.

Oh, and I wouldn't use the article -- by and large, ship names don't include an article.
Annasciamanna on May 6th, 2008 10:44 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Just remember to make her feminine!

Actually, in Italian ships can have masculine names, so that's not a problem :-)
Annasciamanna on May 6th, 2008 10:43 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
::raises hand::

...I wouldn't go for Dispiacere. It's not really regretful sorrow, anyway -- or at least, it's not the way it's mostly used in modern Italian.

On the other hand, it wouldn't be incorrect, so if you like the sound of it, go for it. It does mean "sorrow" (as well as "displeasure"). (It's masculine, and it can't be made feminine -- but that's not a problem because ships can have masculine names in Italian.)

Otherwise, lessee...

I can come up with three other possibilities:

Dolore: sorrow or pain (physical or mental).

Tristezza: sorrow or sadness

Cordoglio: sorrow or grief (most often used to mean "grief", as in "grieving")

...I'll be happy to go into more detail if you have questions!
kitmizkit on May 7th, 2008 09:17 am (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
I bet "Tristezza" is the most recognizeable of those to anybody who's studied a romance language. But "cordoglio" is *perfect* contextually, if it's used to mean grief or grieving. *beams* Awesome. Thank you so much!
Annasciamanna on May 7th, 2008 10:00 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Glad to help!

...oh, and now that I think of it, it doesn't even sound as bad as it looks. The "gl" is pronounced much like a Spanish "ll", not like English "gl". Much smoother all around. Just in case you were worrying :-)
kitmizkit on May 8th, 2008 08:36 am (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Ooh! I hadn't been worried, but that's good to know. It does make it a much prettier word, doesn't it?
kitmizkit on May 16th, 2008 05:22 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
While I'm on the topic of Italian translations, what would be the translation for "priest" or "father" in terms of a priest? :)
Annasciamanna on May 16th, 2008 05:28 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
Padre. That's easy :-)