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06 May 2008 @ 11:07 am
drive-by update  

I started exercising about ten days ago. Ted has lost three pounds. *squinchy face* He said to me, “Keep up whatever you’re doing!” :) *laughs* *Men*. :)

Uh. Research questions: what’s the Italian for sorrow? Is “prime” the Latin plural of “primus”, and is it too mortally offensive to essentially Anglicize that and turn it into “primes” for a multitude of firsts, because I suspect most readers are probably unlikely to actually go from “Primus” as a singular to “Prime” as a plural? Uhm. I probably have other questions too, but those two are the ones that’ve leapt to mind just now. eta: Also: what would be the French for "the river Seine speech", or "the speech given on the river Seine"?

I have been meaning for *weeks* to mention, with delight, that the P-Con Match It For Pratchett donation box brought in $220. I wanted to say thank you to everybody who dropped a couple euro into the pot. You guys are awesome.

Back on my head.

(x-posted from the essential kit)
 
 
Current Mood: workingworking
 
 
 
Cat: TNG: Leakcuriosity on May 6th, 2008 11:10 am (UTC)
Might I recommend little_details?
kitmizkit on May 6th, 2008 11:15 am (UTC)
Oh, yeah, I forget about that community even though I've been pointed at it several times. I shall go there if the knowledge of my own LJ flist fails me, though it hasn't yet. :) Thank you!
(no subject) - curiosity on May 6th, 2008 11:19 am (UTC) (Expand)
Kari Sperringla_marquise_de_ on May 6th, 2008 11:20 am (UTC)
The Latin plural of primus varies according to the gender of the following noun. So: primi if the noun is masculine, primae if feminine, prima if neuter. An 's' is not added in any of these cases. The modern word 'prime' derives from all this (via Old French) but in its noun form is singular as prime, with primes as its plural.
Is that of any use at all?
kitmizkit on May 6th, 2008 11:44 am (UTC)
Should've read this before I responded to the following comment. :) So a group of males would be 'primi'?
(no subject) - la_marquise_de_ on May 6th, 2008 05:04 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Jessica Arielliret on May 6th, 2008 11:24 am (UTC)
Ordinals decline like second declension adjectives, so you would pluralize primus as primi (or primae or primum, for female or neuter.)
kitmizkit on May 6th, 2008 11:43 am (UTC)
Would a group of males be primi or primum?
(no subject) - dancinghorse on May 6th, 2008 12:18 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - mizkit on May 6th, 2008 12:23 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - tmthomas on May 6th, 2008 01:44 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - dancinghorse on May 6th, 2008 06:07 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Laura Anne Gilmansuricattus on May 6th, 2008 12:24 pm (UTC)
I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
What kind of sorrow do you need? Sadness brings to mind tristezza, a regretful sorrow makes me think dispiacere, and there's also doloroso, which may be what you were looking for....?
kitmizkit on May 6th, 2008 12:28 pm (UTC)
Re: I'm not even close to fluent, but I'll take a stab at it...
It's the name of a ship, actually, and regretful sorrow is contextually the idea I want to get across. Dispiacere may well be my word. Thank you! (I know I've got a couple native Italian-speakers on my flist, so hopefully one of them will chime in and make sure this is right. :))
Brian: English: grammar tipslogrusboy on May 6th, 2008 01:09 pm (UTC)
Way to go, Ted! Keep up the good work! Er.... :)

-----

More than one "Prime"? Why does that rub me the same wrong way as "giving 110%"? :)

Just kidding! I trust that you will make it make perfect sense in context. I can already think of a couple of ways to do so myself, not even counting having it derive from people misusing their words--which is, of course, completely realistic.
ghibbitudeghibbitude on May 6th, 2008 01:30 pm (UTC)
regarding the speech/Seine, are you implying the colloquial language of that region or that there was a person in particular who gave a speech at the river Seine.

I'm not 100% sure, but the first would be something like "l'discours dans la riviére Seine" Where as if it's a dialect, it would probably be Ch'Lanchron or Basque or Occitan.
kitmizkit on May 6th, 2008 01:31 pm (UTC)
Oh, an excellent differentiation, and I meant a person in particular who gave a speech at the river Seine.
ghibbitudeghibbitude on May 6th, 2008 01:36 pm (UTC)
Yes, then we'd be looking at l'discours dans la [riviére] Seine
(Deleted comment)
(no subject) - mizkit on May 6th, 2008 04:02 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - la_marquise_de_ on May 6th, 2008 05:08 pm (UTC) (Expand)
ghibbitudeghibbitude on May 6th, 2008 01:32 pm (UTC)
but there again I'm not sure they'd include riviere in france, it's a little like in Germany is the Rhein is the Rhein is the Rhein.
(no subject) - la_marquise_de_ on May 6th, 2008 05:09 pm (UTC) (Expand)
sammywolsammywol on May 6th, 2008 05:14 pm (UTC)
guys!

I can't see anyone getting the plural prime. It is singular in English and, aside from prime numbers, never really appears in the plural the way 'firsts' does. I have hunted a few Latin translation sites and none seem to translate 'prime' or indeed acknowledge 'prime' as a Latin word (grinds teeth) as a plural but of course they don't work so well in reverse because they offer a variety of declensions and I don't know which is which. 'Primes' in English is going to cause issues because that makes it look like the verb which means something else again. Gives up now.

'Sorrow' is an odd one. I would think a trawl of opera sites might help. 'dolore' and 'tristezza' don't quite match. I can find a tame Italian to ask if you wish.
sammywolsammywol on May 6th, 2008 05:17 pm (UTC)
Should have checked comments first. Everyone is way ahead of me. Dispiacere!