March 22nd, 2016

catie_cute

thinks to do, easter break edition

maybe if i write it all down i’ll get it done.

housecleaning
– living room
» vacuum
» perhaps wash windows ahahahah
» put laundry away
» deal with random trash
– kitchen
» vacuum
» windows
» put laundry away
» deal with random trash
» wash floors
– library
» vacuum
» windows
» deal with random trash
» deal with random *stuff*
– vacuum stairs
– our bedroom
» vacuum
» clear off dresser
» change sheets
– guest room
» vacuum
» change sheets
» put shoes away
– office
» vacuum
» put things away/tidy
– indy’s room
» fix curtains
» vacuum
» try to cull toys
– put new lightbulb in upstairs closet
– and in upstairs hall
– do laundry
» fold laundry
» put laundry away
» do it all again *sigh*
– tidy sun room
– clean upstairs bathroom
– clean downstairs bathroom
not housecleaning
finish old races short story
– finish ATLANTIS FALLEN edits
go to zoo
get easter stuff
dye easter eggs
– /d/i/n/n/e/r/ /w/i/t/h/ /t/h/e/ /g/i/r/l/s/?/ nope
– send applications

(x-posted from The Essential Kit)

catie_cute

The Magic & Manners Project: Publication Process

Part two of my series on all-out self publishing, a project I’ve taken on with MAGIC & MANNERS, a Jane Austen pastiche in which I wondered what would happen if the Bennet sisters had too much magic rather than too little cash. Part One, which focuses on finding and working with a production team as well as developing a work flow (including a Helpful Check List) is here.

This week I’m going to look at the actual publication process. I’ve been working through Amazon and Ingram, who are both doing what’s called Print On Demand (POD), which means the book is printed when you order a copy, rather than having copies sitting around a warehouse waiting for someone to order them.

I assume you know about Amazon. :) They have a couple of self-publishing arms, one for print books (CreateSpace) and one for ebooks (KDP). Bookstores, very reasonably, don’t want to buy print books from Amazon, and Amazon has a captive audience for its ebooks, as they’re the largest distributor of them and have the lion’s share of the market with their Kindle e-readers. I am, largely, not going to talk about Amazon, because it’s such a closed ecosystem the whole process is somewhat different.

Ingram is one of the two largest book distributors in the world; they are, in other words, the people from whom the bookstores buy their books. They have a self-publishing arm, IngramSpark, and it used to be that in their listings (where bookstores order from) they listed the self-published books separately, in an area where they wouldn’t come up for a bookstore unless the store went in there specifically looking for it…which bookstores had no reason to do. A while ago, though, I read that Ingram had changed that policy and that Spark books were now available broadly throughout their system, and I’ve been very interested in pursuing a self-published book with them since, because the theory here was that a self-published CE Murphy book could now turn up in (say, the Barnes & Noble) system and cause them to say “oh sure we’ll order that.”

It’s not actually that easy, because without a reason to look for a new CE Murphy book there’s no reason they would, but in theory, it *allows* them to, at least. I’ll get to promotion in a later post, because it’s going to be too big to bite off here, but in short, right now that’s why it’s really fantastic for readers to go into their local bookstores and ask if they can have a copy ordered in, and suggest short-ordering (which means just ordering a couple of them) some for the shelves.

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(x-posted from The Essential Kit)