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12 May 2014 @ 11:57 am
speaking of reading  

Not that I was actually speaking of it, but I have faint ambitions of actually re-reading TIGANA this month (technically it was April’s book and I should be reading A SONG FOR ARBONNE this month, but, er, it didn’t work that way :)) just in case anybody wants to do my lurching read-along on that book.

Ted just finished reading Marion G Harmon‘s Wearing the Cape series, which he’s enjoyed very much, so I gotta put those on my reading list. Which I should update, to keep me honest. Although frankly I’m doing a *terrible* job of not buying new books and just reading the ones I’ve got. I’ve read, according to Goodreads, 34 books this year, and…2 of them…are on the list behind the cut. o.o

(*checks* 11 of them are re-reads, 3 are books I was given for blurbing and the rest, um. Are new. Heh. Right. Let’s give that “no buying new books” thing another whirl, eh…?)

TBR shelf that, um, needs updating (but has been alphabetized!) behind the cut…


Aaron, Rachel: THE LEGEND OF ELI MONPRESS, THE REVENGE OF ELI MONPRESS
Barnes, Mark T: THE GARDEN OF STONES
Brennan, Sarah Rees: UNTOLD
Broadous, Maurice: THE KNIGHTS OF BRENTON COURT
Buchanan, Col: FARLANDER
Cabot, Meg: ABANDON
Campbell, Alan: SEA OF GHOSTS
Carroll, Michael: SUPERHUMAN, THE ASCENSION
Clare, Cassandra, CLOCKWORK ANGEL
Cobley, Michael: SEEDS OF EARTH
Copperman, EJ: CHANCE OF A GHOST, AN UNINVITED GHOST
Cornell, Paul: LONDON FALLING
Delaney, Joseph: THE SPOOK’S DESTINY
Elliott, Kate, COLD MAGIC
Friedman, Celia: LEGACY OF KINGS
Flwelling, Lynn: THE BONE DOLL’S TWIN, THE ORACLE’S QUEEN, HIDDEN WARRIOR
Gaiman, Neil: THE GRAVEYARD BOOK
Hambly, Barbara: RAN AWAY, GOOD MAN FRIDAY
Harkaway, Nick: ANGELMAKER
Heyer, Georgette: FRIDAY’S CHILD, THE GRAND SOPHIE
Hunter, Faith: DEATH’S RIVAL, RAVEN CURSED
Hurley, Kameron: GOD’S WAR
Kay, Guy Gavriel: RIVER OF STARS
Kemp, Gene: THE TURBULENT TERM OF TYKE TILER
Knight, Francis: FADE TO BLACK
Kristoff, Jay: SHADOWDANCER
Lo, Malinda: HUNTRESS
Lyle, Anne: THE ALCHEMIST OF SOULS
Lynch, Scott: THE REPUBLIC OF THIEVES
Macallan, Ben: DESDAEMONA
McKenna, Juliet E: BLOOD IN THE WATER, BANNERS IN THE WIND
Newman, Emma: BETWEEN TWO THORNS
Sagara, Michelle: SILENCE, TOUCH
Scalzi, John, REDSHIRTS
Shevdon, Mike: STRANGENESS & CHARM
Sperring, Kari: THE GRASS KING’S CONCUBINE
Steele, Allen: SPINDRIFT
Tchaikovsky, Adrian: EMPIRE IN BLACK AND GOLD
Whates, Ian: CITY OF DREAMS & NIGHTMARES
Williams, Walter Jon: THIS IS NOT A GAME
Wexler, Django: THE FORBIDDEN LIBRARY
Yolen, Jane & Snyder, Mydori: EXCEPT THE QUEEN

Non-Fiction:
Clements, Jonathan: A BRIEF HISTORY OF KHUBILAI KHAN
Emmerson, Charles: THE FUTURE HISTORY OF THE ARCTIC
Garfield, Simon: JUST MY TYPE
Goldstone, Nancy: JOANNA
Isaacson, Rupert: THE HORSE BOY
Leon, Vicki: 4000 YEARS OF UPPITY WOMEN
Trigger: UNDERSTANDING EARLY CIVILZATIONS
Weatherford, Jack: SECRET HISTORY OF THE MONGOL QUEENS
Weir, Alison: ELEANOR OF AQUITAINE
Wilson, Ben: DECENCY & DISORDER

(x-posted from The Essential Kit)

 
 
 
Chrysoulachrysoula on May 12th, 2014 03:38 pm (UTC)
I'll _give_ you a new book.... :-)

Also, that non-fiction list looks great. How do you find this stuff?
kitmizkit on May 12th, 2014 03:57 pm (UTC)
O NOES NOT THE BRIAR PATCH, SISTA SOULA! *grabby hands*!

Well, let's see...

JUST MY TYPE caught my eye because I like typography. It's an amazingly fascinating read, too, except if I read too much at once I start having really intense typography dreams and that just gets weird.

JOANNA (THE NOTORIOUS QUEEN OF NAPLES, JERUSALEM & SICILY) caught my eye yesterday while I was looking for a book about Eleanor of Aquitaine.

THE HORSE BOY was a gift from someone who thought its shamanistic journey would interest me.

4000 YEARS OF UPPITY WOMEN was a B&N special I couldn't resist.

UNDERSTANDING EARLY CIVILZATIONS was recommended by mikaela and at the moment of purchase I knew exactly what I wanted to get from it but have since forgotten what exactly that inspiration was.

SECRET HISTORY OF THE MONGOL QUEENS was recommended by dancinghorse and is stunningly interesting.

ELEANOR OF AQUITAINE is actually a re-read, but on the whole I recommend Alison Weir's books wholeheartedly; for my money she's one of the best and most readable biographic historians out there.

DECENCY & DISORDER was one of half a dozen purchases toward learning more about the Napoleonic/Regency era in England with the intention of writing some Sharpe-style spy novels, and is happening to have a lot of other uses too.

:)
Mary Anne: pixelpers1stence on May 12th, 2014 03:59 pm (UTC)
Read Song for Arbonne over the weekend. It, like Tigana, technically is a Fionavar "shadow" world... :)
kitmizkit on May 12th, 2014 04:36 pm (UTC)
I'm working on a theory that they're all the *same* shadow world. That he writes in Fionavar and an alternate-earth-shadow-world which may actually include the earth of the Finoavar Tapestry and YSABEL...
Mary Annepers1stence on May 12th, 2014 04:40 pm (UTC)
I had been thinking along those lines as well, but I can't remember if that connection is explicit in all the books or not, since it's been so long since I read many of them.
Mary Annepers1stence on May 12th, 2014 04:49 pm (UTC)
errrr, i meant to say that I think they're all shadow worlds of Fionavar, not that they are the same shadow world. which has not yet been precluded certainly.....the question would be whether "our" shadow earth has two moons or not? Arbonne definitely has two moons as does Tigana. But Tigana seems to have a distinct element of magic lacking in "our" earth although magic clearly works on "our" earth (at least in the Tapestry books, can't remember about Ysabel). the flavor of magic between Tigana and Arbonne seem a little different to me.
mikaela_lmikaela_l on May 12th, 2014 06:27 pm (UTC)

Yay for book recommendations that works! :) ( I think Understanding Ancient Civilizations is an awesome book. I need to re-read it soon.)


I think at least a third of your TBR list matches mine. And come Midsummer, I'll give you a book too. :)

One thing I have found helps when it comes to buying new books is " No new books until I've read the books I already own." Oh. And buy a short story/ novella to test an new to me author out.
(Deleted comment)
kitmizkit on May 13th, 2014 02:30 pm (UTC)
*laughs* Interesting as in eclectic, perhaps? :) And yeah, I know how REDSHIRTS is structured, and have, of course, watched the original Star Trek, so I imagine I'll enjoy it. Eventually. :)

Both FRIDAY'S CHILD and GRAND SOPHIE come highly recommended, so I'm looking forward to reading them. I picked up a random Heyer as my first and laughed all the way through, so it was a very successful first venture. :)

To my real disappointment, I bounced off the Broaddus books hard. I love Arthurian re-tellings and thought the idea of his was terrific, and was really looking forward to reading them, to the point that I pushed through my initial bounce-off when I realized that perhaps part of the problem was that there were effectively no female characters in the first section. I was kind of starting to warm up when around page 100 there was a scene so absolutely horrible that I put the book down and desperately wished I hadn't kept going after my initial bounce. :/